Spanish artist Bea Sarrias on how she uses architecture to capture light

Her new architectonic series depicts landmarks by Paul Rudolph, Pierre Koenig and Richard Neutra

Spanish artist Bea Sarrias depicts modernist buildings with an evocative quality in her Iconic Architectures series, which is on show at the Jordi Barnadas art gallery in Barcelona.

Her architectonic series features a dramatic use of light and shadow, interesting perspectives, sweeping brushwork, and warm colours, which draw the viewer into the spaces.

Featured in her artworks are famous modern buildings, including Paul Rudolph’s Sarasota High School in Florida, Pierre Koenig’s Stahl House in Los Angeles, Richard Neutra’s Mariners Medical Arts Building in California and José Antonio Coderch’s Güell House in Barcelona.

Sarrias says she paints houses and architectural spaces because architecture is the best way to describe light. ‘Light can evoke many feelings… the feeling of nostalgia, of absence, of presence,’ she says.

Goddess of fortune by Bea Sarrais. Acrylic and collage on canvas. An office within the headquarters of the design company Santa & Cole, by Manuel Baldrich, designed in 1964-1968 in Belloch (Barcelona).
Goddess of fortune by Bea Sarrais. Acrylic and collage on canvas. An office within the headquarters of the design company Santa & Cole, by Manuel Baldrich, designed in 1964-1968 in Belloch (Barcelona).

To create the paintings, Sarrias modifies and reinterprets the architecture to capture a sense of time and mood, which she creates through light. ‘My paintings are a window to another place,’ she says. ‘They transport you physically and emotionally into a place you have to be.’

Painting with a realistic technique, Sarrias often depicts interiors as inhabited spaces, filled with objects but without people, which allows light to take centre stage.

To form her pictorial intention, Sarrias spends many hours researching the buildings. ‘My work is anthropological,’ she says. ‘I speak to the owners and research its history. I spend the day inhabiting it, seeing how the air and nature interact with the architecture and document it with photography and sometimes film. I try and capture how I felt inside the house.’

The exhibition can be visited online and by appointment until June 30.

Galeria Jordi Barnadas, Consell de Cent, 347, 08007, Barcelona, Spain.

Patio Coderch, by Bea Sarrias. 60 x 73 cm. Acrylic on wood. Zóbel House by José Antonio Coderch, in Sotogrande (Madrid), built between 1970 and 1972.
Patio Coderch, by Bea Sarrias. 60 x 73 cm. Acrylic on wood. Zóbel House by José Antonio Coderch, in Sotogrande (Madrid), built between 1970 and 1972.
In and out, by Bea Sarrias. 10 x 70 cm. Acrylic on wood. Güell House, in Barcelona, designed by José Antonio Coderch in 1971.
In and out, by Bea Sarrias. 10 x 70 cm. Acrylic on wood. Güell House, in Barcelona, designed by José Antonio Coderch in 1971.
Pine, by Bea Sarrias. 50 x 50 cm. Acrylic on canvas. Mariners Medical Arts Building, Newport Beach (CA), designed by Richard Neutra (1963).
Pine, by Bea Sarrias. 50 x 50 cm. Acrylic on canvas. Mariners Medical Arts Building, Newport Beach (CA), designed by Richard Neutra (1963).
Photography: Mahala Nuuk
Photography: Mahala Nuuk

Musician ARP takes us on a tour of Sicily landmark Cretto di Burri

Latest Stories

Latest

Share Tweet
+