Photography: Alex Zarour via Compass

Originally built for poet Alice Lynch, this adobe home in LA retains plenty of the hallmarks of its 100-year history.

Local architect Henry Harwood Hewitt designed the property in 1922, together with adobe builder John Byers. Dubbed the Alice Lynch Residence, the home spans 2,500 square feet and includes four bedrooms arranged around a U-shaped floor plan.

A light-filled living space sits at the heart of the property – which is listed with Compass for $1.8m. Original arch-shaped doors bring the outdoors into a room that’s framed by original timber ceiling beams and wooden floors. There’s also a brick fireplace located at one end of the space.

It opens onto a walled courtyard, which is home to an enormous cactus as well as an outdoor shower, hidden behind one of the home’s adobe walls. Elsewhere the owners have made some gentle updates to the property, installing concrete sinks and other contemporary fixtures.

Photography: Alex Zarour via Compass
Photography: Alex Zarour via Compass
Photography: Alex Zarour via Compass

These off-grid guesthouses are built around the craggy Tramuntana landscape

Latest Stories

Latest

Share Tweet
+

Privacy Preference Center

Required Cookies & Technologies

Some of the technologies we use are necessary for critical functions like security and site integrity, account authentication, security and privacy preferences, internal site usage and maintenance data, and to make the site work correctly for browsing and transactions.

gdpr, woocommerce_cart_hash, woocommerce_items_in_cart, _wp_wocommerce_session, sucuri_cloudproxy_uuid_*

Site Customisation

Cookies and similar technologies are used to improve your experience, to do things like:

- remember your login, general, and regional preferences
- personalize content, search, recommendations, and offers

Without these technologies, things like personalised recommendations, your account preferences, or localisation may not work correctly.

wp-settings-*

Personalised Advertising

These technologies are used for things like:

- personalised ads
- to limit how many times you see an ad
- to understand usage via Google Analytics
- to understand how you got to our web properties
- to ensure that we understand the audience and can provide relevant ads

We do this with social media, marketing, and analytics partners (who may have their own information they’ve collected). Saying no will not stop you from seeing our ads, but it may make them less relevant or more repetitive.

_ga, _gid, gat,_gads,_fbp