See highlights from our digital travels this week…

The Soviet space camps that float in time

Photography: Maria Gruzdeva
Photography: Maria Gruzdeva

Soviet Russia’s cosmonaut training facilities were once cutting-edge tech HQs at the forefront of the Cold War space race. These centres – in Kazakhstan and Moscow – are still in operation today, but their interiors look like they’ve been suspended in time. ‘Very little has changed in those spaces so the spirit remains. It’s one of the things that drew me to it,’ says photographer Maria Gruzdeva. Take a look around the bases on It’s Nice That.

Explore Dalí’s paintings in 3D

Salvador Dalí paintings look wacky enough in 2D form but one creative agency is taking them a step further. Goodby SIlverstein & Partners has created virtual worlds of the artist’s work – specifically his Archeological Reminiscence of Millet’s ‘Angelus’ – for the Dalí Museum’s new initiative to let viewers go ‘inside’ his pieces. FastCo Design has the latest.

A haunting glimpse inside the Costa Concordia

Photography: Jonathan Danko Kielkowski
Photography: Jonathan Danko Kielkowski

Four years after it fatally ran aground off the coast of Tuscany, the Costa Concordia ship is moored 200m off the coast of Genoa waiting to be scrapped. Photographer Jonathan Danko Kielkowski swam the distance and climbed aboard to capture a haunting portrait of the decaying ship. The Guardian has more.

The film set that missed its starring role

Credit: Urbex Central
Credit: Urbex Central

Urban explorers at Urbex Central stumbled upon an ancient village in rural New Zealand – only to discover that everything was artificial. The village, which looked a little like Jerusalem, was an abandoned set for a film that never got made. Hundreds of film projects get tossed out every year, but it has to hurt when you’ve already gone to so much effort…

Refugees rebuild Syrian landmarks – in miniature

Credit: UNHCR / Christopher Herwig
Credit: UNHCR / Christopher Herwig

Earlier this week, Iraq’s oldest Christian monastery was added to the list of UNESCO heritage sites destroyed by Isis, joining the ancient city of Palmyra and the Krak des Chevaliers castle in Homs. Now a group of Syrian refugees have found a novel way to preserve their lost heritage. Residents of a camp in Jordan are using scrap materials to build miniature models of these historic landmarks. CityLab reports.

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