Photography: Joshua Perez for New Story

Tech construction pioneer ICON has unveiled the inaugural batch of completed homes at the world’s first 3D printed village in Tabasco, Mexico.

The pair of houses took just 24 hours to print and are the first of 50 planned for the village, designed for low-income residents. Designer and tiny home expert Yves Béhar worked alongside ICON and homelessness charity New Story on the prototypes for the 500-sq-ft dwellings which sit in an earthquake zone and are engineered beyond safety standards.

Each residence comprises two bedrooms, a bathroom and a covered, wraparound patio, and was finished by local practice Échale after the initial print stage, completed by ICON’s Vulcan II printer.

The Vulcan II 3D-printed the houses in layers using a locally-mixed cement in the rural area, and flat-roofed structures sit atop a cement pad. Their ribbed walls look like a 21st-century take on traditional adobe dwellings and are finished in an off-white shade.

It’s not yet been disclosed how much the dwellings cost to build but work on the remaining houses continues with residents expected to move in from early 2020.

[h/t Dwell]

The world’s first affordable 3D printed village pops-up in Mexico
Photography: Joshua Perez for New Story
The world’s first affordable 3D printed village pops-up in Mexico
Photography: Joshua Perez for New Story

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