Architecture I 28.01.19 I by

A medieval Irish church is reborn as a museum in Kilkenny

McCullough Mulvin Architects has transformed a 13th-century church in Ireland’s Kilkenny into a museum for medieval artefacts.

Medieval Mile Museum recently scooped a nomination for the Mies van Der Rohe 2019 Award for its innovative adaptive reuse. The practice restored the ancient medical building, which is shaped like a crucifix and constructed using Irish grey stone.

Medieval Irish church is reborn as a museum in Kilkenny
Photography: Christian Richters

The old part has been joined by a new extension built from timber and lead that blends with the church’s austere facade and blends with the sky.

Inside the Medieval Mile Museum, a vast section of the original medieval timber roof has been left exposed, pulling the eyes upwards to dramatic effect. Archaeological excavations also revealed elements of the building’s original foundations which were removed over the centuries, including the demolished chancel and aisles. These elements have been reintroduced in different materials, using the base of the original walls.

Medieval Irish church is reborn as a museum in Kilkenny
Photography: Christian Richters

Interiors of the converted church are lined with carved limestone tombs and funerary monuments from the Middle Ages to the 20th century.

2 St Mary’s Lane, High Street, Kilkenny, Ireland

Medieval Irish church is reborn as a museum in Kilkenny
Photography: Christian Richters
Medieval church turned museum in Ireland
Photography: Christian Richters

[Via Designboom]

Read next: The most radical adaptive reuse projects of 2018

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