Photography: Ivan Muraenko

Gregory Orekhov’s Black Square installation offers a new perspective on Moscow’s Malevich Park thanks to its dizzying mirrored corridor.

Seen from the front, the artwork is a simple pair of black monoliths – but once passersby step inside they can enjoy a mind-bending view from between two huge mirrors. They both blend into and contrast the surrounding skies and greenery, creating unending duplicate reflections of nature and the person viewing it.

Curator and critic Mikhail Sidlin says Black Square transforms the viewer ‘into an accomplice, falling into an endless corridor of reflections’. He compares the ‘multidimensional space’ inside the sculpture with the cult horror film Cube, which follows a group of people as they try to escape from a series of cube-shaped traps.

It’s not the first time that Orekhov has worked with reflective surfaces, often using mirror-polished stainless steel in his work. This latest piece is intended as a monument to avant-garde artist Kazimir Malevich – who also lends his name to the surrounding park.

Gregory Orekhov’s Black Square installation offers a new perspective on Moscow’s Malevich Park
Photography: Ivan Muraenko
Gregory Orekhov’s Black Square installation offers a new perspective on Moscow’s Malevich Park
Photography: Ivan Muraenko
Gregory Orekhov’s Black Square installation offers a new perspective on Moscow’s Malevich Park
Photography: Ivan Muraenko
Gregory Orekhov’s Black Square installation offers a new perspective on Moscow’s Malevich Park
Photography: Ivan Muraenko

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