Malin + Goetz opens two apothecaries in London designed by Jonathan Tuckey

Twin stores with distinct personalities

New York skincare brand Malin + Goetz has set up shop across the pond in not one, but two, London locations.

The company enlisted adaptive reuse specialists Jonathan Tuckey Design to create two distinct spaces on Upper Street in Islington and Monmouth Street in Covent Garden.

Says Tuckey: ‘Malin + Goetz wanted the stores to be very specific to the buildings they’re in and their surrounding locations.’

The Islington store takes over the ground floor of a late Victorian building, which Tuckey has lined with a bespoke shelving grid made from American Douglas fir. Period details include a curved glass entryway, as well as an apothecary counter from the late 19th century.

‘On Upper Street, the store has a warm, down-to-earth and local feel about it,’ says Tuckey.

Malin + Goetz, Monmouth Street Photography: Dirk Lindner
Malin + Goetz, Monmouth Street
Photography: Dirk Lindner

The Monmouth Street space is entered via a velvet-lined tunnel that takes cues from the theatres that dot the area. White wooden floors and birch plywood walls provide a dramatic counterpoint.

‘Covent Garden is a much more dynamic area, where people work and visit rather than simply live,’ Tuckey notes. ‘Malin & Goetz needed something that would be more arresting and cinematic.’

Malin + Goetz, Monmouth Street Photography: Dirk Lindner
Malin + Goetz, Monmouth Street
Photography: Dirk Lindner

Despite the deliberately differing aesthetics of the two space, they have one thing in common. Says founder Matthew Malin: ‘These stores are contemporary interpretations of traditional apothecaries.’

Tuckey made sure to reference Malin + Goetz’s homeland in the design. ‘We share a love for Donald Judd furniture,’ he says. ‘We liked the idea that Upper Street’s shell was made from American plywood, which Donald Judd used. That’s a subtle nod to their American roots.’

The Malin + Goetz stores at 146 Upper Street and 6 Monmouth Street are now open.

Read next: How do you build on the built? Designer Jonathan Tuckey debates the thorny issue

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